The sisters

This cabinet card came to me from Bath, England, but it has nothing written on it to give us a clue as to its origins.  Two women stand protectively behind a third, who is seated in a wheelchair.  The three resemble each other so closely that they must be sisters.  Posed in a triangle, they... Continue Reading →

Twins of Watertown, New York

They must be two sets of twins.  The back of this CDV doesn't tell us anything about them, but it does identify the photographer, C. W. Gill.   I didn't find anything about Gill online.  The Hubbard Block was built on Public Square by Volney Stow Hubbard in 1868, which is about when this photo was... Continue Reading →

Family in Brussels

This carte-de-visite was made by the studio of Albert Baron & César Mitkewicz in Brussels (Bruxelles), Belgium.  The mother's gaze engages the viewer while the father's seems unfocused.  The two sisters pose affectionately as the younger one reads from a book.  

Tamara and her little sister

I joked in an earlier post about sibling portraits being amusing, but a more appropriate adjective for this studio portrait might be "intense."  Looking at the back, the postcard was likely printed in the United States.  A note is written in a young hand in Russian: "To dear Grandma and Grandpa from Tamara."

Lessons in the grass

This postcard came from the estate of Hazel Alberts Peterson (1898-1989).  As a girl, Hazel Alberts attended Seattle Seminary, a Free Methodist college preparatory school.  College-level classes were introduced in 1910, and in 1915 the school's name was changed to Seattle Pacific College.  For more information about Hazel and her family, please see the page... Continue Reading →

Steady now!

Each cyclist in this group is holding the handlebars of the person on either side.  I wonder if they stayed upright in the end?  The photo is glued to a stiff piece of paper with no information about the date, place or photographer.  The only clues are initials below each rider, which suggest that several... Continue Reading →

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