Pause in the workday (2 of 2)

In this photo the coworkers from the previous post have been joined by four more men.  The man at far right may be an owner or manager.  The four women who stood arm-in-arm in the previous photo are now seated together in front. Here you can see the photo in high resolution:    

Pause in the workday (1 of 2)

This cabinet card contains a group of coworkers at an unidentified location.  A man at lower right is conspicuously holding what appears to be a screwdriver. The man at far left is wearing an apron with something dark on it, perhaps oil or ink.  The man next to him is holding a pencil.  Between them... Continue Reading →

Young nun in Bourgogne

This ethereal CDV portrait was made by A. Brossut of Digoin, Bourgogne (Burgundy).  The young woman isn't identified.  I found a few references online to "A. Brossut, éditeur," but no other information about the photographer.  

Lessons in the grass

This postcard came from the estate of Hazel Alberts Peterson (1898-1989).  As a girl, Hazel Alberts attended Seattle Seminary, a Free Methodist college preparatory school.  College-level classes were introduced in 1910, and in 1915 the school's name was changed to Seattle Pacific College.  For more information about Hazel and her family, please see the page... Continue Reading →

Amanda Sanford, M.D. (1883)

An inscription in pencil on the back of this carte-de-visite says simply: "Dr. Sanford 1883."  She was easy to identify, and her individual story is fascinating and inspiring.  I also learned that Dr. Sanford's life and career were closely connected to those of other pioneering women in medicine and in other fields who supported and... Continue Reading →

Breaking and sorting rocks (1891)

This unusual image shows a group of men engaging in the labor-intensive process of breaking rocks into pieces and sorting them by size for use in road construction.  A small smokestack in the background indicates that a steam engine powered the conveyor which carried pieces of rock up to a sorting sieve.  

Studio portrait of a young cook

To continue the cooking theme of the previous post, this postcard from Germany is an unusual portrait of a young cook in her kitchen uniform.  Taken in a studio against a rustic painted backdrop, her spotless white clothes glow under careful studio lighting. Like CDVs in the nineteenth century, individual postcard portraits were often exchanged... Continue Reading →

Cooking class

This photo postcard likely originated in northern Europe.  The presence of a nun at the back of the room and a crucifix on the wall suggest the class may have been offered by a convent or other Catholic organization.  The back provides no information.

“Maud’s Family”

This 1909 school portrait came from the same small Maine album that "Two Good Friends" did in the previous post.  Both titles are written in the album. Click on the images below to enlarge them.    

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