Juhan Kukk, State Elder of Estonia, with Finnish Envoy Rudolf Holsti (1923)

This formal portrait has a handwritten inscription on the back: "Rudolf Holsti, Tallinna, 1923, helmikussa."  Tallinn is the capital of Estonia, and helmikussa means February in Finnish. Rudolf Holsti (1881-1945) became one of the founding fathers of the Republic of Finland after that country declared its independence from Soviet Russia in December 1917.  He served... Continue Reading →

Couple in Windsor, Vermont, shortly before the end of the Civil War

The two cartes-de-visite above were made by Henry Cushing in Windsor, Vermont, in February 1865.  Windsor is on the Connecticut River, which forms the boundary between Vermont and New Hampshire.  The town is connected to Cornish, NH, by the Cornish-Windsor Covered Bridge, the longest wooden covered bridge in the United States.  Coincidentally, the portraits were... Continue Reading →

Two men from Riga, Latvia

The two cartes-de-visite on this page came from an antiques dealer in Greenfield, Massachusetts, in the northwest part of the state.  On the back of the carte above is the name Adolphe with a question mark:   The portrait was made at the studio of E.v. Eggert, which probably stood for Emmanuel von Eggert (see... Continue Reading →

Partners

This photograph came from a dealer in Llangefni, Wales, who didn't know where it had originated.  It appears to be a gelatin silver print, mounted on heavy cardboard, and I'd guess it was made around 1900. Although the photo isn't particularly old, the image has a timeless quality.  Nothing about it looks modern or industrial.... Continue Reading →

Tennis Anyone?

I’ve been playing tennis since I was twelve, so I always enjoy seeing rackets in portraits, even when they’re just props. This photobooth portrait is wonderful. I love the combination of a child’s racket with palm trees and pyramids.

Re-blogged from Photobooth Journal:

Photobooth Journal

photoboothTennisAnyone?

I adore the fact that this young lady thought to take her tennis racket into a photobooth! I’ve never seen another booth photo that memorialises a sport in this way. The background is interesting for its Egyptian theme of palm trees and pyramids. This is also something I haven’t seen before.

In faded handwriting on the back are these words. . .

photoboothTennisBackOriginalBack02

My Spanish is good enough to make out some of the script on the back of this pic, but I am hoping someone out there might confirm that I have it right, or tell me where I have gone wrong!

A mi querida mama con todos el cariño, Julita – To my dear mother with all my love, Julita

The information on the bottom is too faded for me to make sense of. I am assuming it is a place-name and a date, 1945 being part of it?

photoboothTennisBACK01

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The piano tuner (Wales)

The young man appearing on this carte-de-visite could be certain everyone would remember his profession.  You might even say he was in tune with the latest trends in advertising and self-promotion.  The one thing he neglected to do was write his name on the back, which is a pity. The CDV was made by James... Continue Reading →

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