Charles and Susan Crippen

The portrait above is an ambrotype, or photograph on glass, by an unknown photographer.  Ambrotypes were introduced in the United States in the early 1850s and remained popular for about a decade.  They were simpler and less costly to produce than daguerreotypes.  Eventually they were replaced by tintypes and albumen paper prints (such as the... Continue Reading →

“Pretty little Ruth”

Along the bottom of this carte-de-visite is a handwritten inscription: Oh!  A very shy young Quakeress am I And they call me Pretty little Ruth When I first published this post, I speculated that these lines might have come from a play, and that the young woman in the photograph might have been wearing a... Continue Reading →

Man with blanket in Cleveland by Thomas T. Sweeny

The man in this carte-de-visite portrait isn't identified.  Why does he have a blanket wrapped around him?  He seems to be pointing at it:   The photographer, Thomas T. Sweeny (1831-1891), worked in Cleveland, Ohio, throughout his life.  Although he was active for about three decades, information about him is scarce online.  Census records indicate... Continue Reading →

“After the Regatta”

I had hoped to share a sporting image here on the blog while the Summer Olympics were going on in Tokyo, but the two weeks went by so fast that I didn't manage it.  Since today is the day after the Olympics, it seems appropriate to share a stereoview titled After the Regatta.  Published by... Continue Reading →

Man with royal charter

This cabinet card photograph is the first image I've shared from Australia.  It was printed at the Anson Brothers studio in Hobart, Tasmania, which was in operation from 1878 to 1891.  Founded by brothers Joshua, Henry Joseph and Richard Edwin Anson, the studio became known for views of Tasmanian scenery, which received medals at the... Continue Reading →

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