Newlyweds in Torah, Minnesota

According to information in an article in the St. Cloud Times in July 2015, the town of Richmond, Minnesota, was officially called Torah for nineteen years, from 1890 until 1909.  It had been called Richmond informally by locals before that, but when the town was incorporated in 1890, the name Richmond was already in use at... Continue Reading →

The new dress

The day of the party has arrived.  She and her friends have been working on their dresses for weeks. "Let's take pictures!" "I don't know, I have a lot of things left to do.  Maybe later." "It'll only take a few minutes to set up the camera.  We might be too busy later." "You're right. ... Continue Reading →

Science class in the field, somewhere in Tsarist Russia

This postcard has no message or information on the back, but it came from a dealer in Pennsylvania who specializes in photographs from Imperial Russia (pre-1917).  The empire of the Tsars was truly vast, encompassing areas of northeastern Europe and Central Asia which today are made up of independent nations.  It's impossible to say exactly... Continue Reading →

Juhan Kukk, State Elder of Estonia, with Finnish Envoy Rudolf Holsti (1923)

This formal portrait has a handwritten inscription on the back: "Rudolf Holsti, Tallinna, 1923, helmikussa."  Tallinn is the capital of Estonia, and helmikussa means February in Finnish. Rudolf Holsti (1881-1945) became one of the founding fathers of the Republic of Finland after that country declared its independence from Soviet Russia in December 1917.  He served... Continue Reading →

Couple in Windsor, Vermont, shortly before the end of the Civil War

The two cartes-de-visite above were made by Henry Cushing in Windsor, Vermont, in February 1865.  Windsor is on the Connecticut River, which forms the boundary between Vermont and New Hampshire.  The town is connected to Cornish, NH, by the Cornish-Windsor Covered Bridge, the longest wooden covered bridge in the United States.  Coincidentally, the portraits were... Continue Reading →

Two men from Riga, Latvia

The two cartes-de-visite on this page came from an antiques dealer in Greenfield, Massachusetts, in the northwest part of the state.  On the back of the carte above is the name Adolphe with a question mark:   The portrait was made at the studio of E.v. Eggert, which probably stood for Emmanuel von Eggert (see... Continue Reading →

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