Young roller skater in Calcutta

If only we knew her story!  Alas, she isn't identified.  Her carte-de-visite was made by John Bowles Newman, whose studio was at 5, Old Court House Street, Calcutta (Kolkata).  The only information I found online about Mr. Newman was that he filed a petition of insolvency in 1879.  It always makes me sad to read... Continue Reading →

Three dapper fellows in Wellington, New Zealand

This portrait is the first one on the blog from New Zealand.  (There isn't one yet from Australia.)  The three chaps aren't identified, unfortunately.  The cabinet card was made at the studio of Wrigglesworth & Binns in Wellington.  James Dacie Wrigglesworth (1836-1906) and Frederick Charles Binns (1844-1915) also maintained studios in Christchurch and Dunedin.  ... Continue Reading →

Performers in Chicago

The group above isn't identified and the photo has faded quite a bit.  The only information on the cabinet card is the name and address of the Chicago studio of William L. Koehne (1869-1965) and Charles F. Bretzman (1867-1934).  The partnership between the two photographers began by 1894 and ended in 1899 or very early... Continue Reading →

Woman at a spinner’s weasel

Have you heard the term spinner's weasel?  I hadn't until a few days ago, when I started researching the photo above.  The photo is slightly smaller than a cabinet card and more square.  I would tentatively date it to the 1890s (+/- 10 years).  On the back, a previous owner wrote the word Shaker, referring... Continue Reading →

A regal party

This large-format photograph came to me from the United Kingdom.  Unfortunately, it has nothing written on it and I haven't identified anyone in it.  Hanging high on the wall is a shield with a crown on it.  Would the crown indicate a royal household?  I've brightened it below to make it a little easier to... Continue Reading →

Ready for the call?

In the first comment under the previous post, Shayne Davidson said the nurses' uniforms reminded her of the BBC series Call the Midwife.  Her comment made me look anew at the photo above, which also came from the United Kingdom, and wonder if the young sitter might have been preparing to work as a midwife or... Continue Reading →

Two Russian friends in white

This portrait of two friends was probably made in late imperial Russia (1910-1917).  The only thing written on the back is a pair of names, which look to me like Tyosha and Marusya (Tеща и Маруся).  I'm not sure about the name Tyosha, as I haven't encountered it before:   The girls are both dressed... Continue Reading →

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