Vermonter who’d rather be doing something useful

Vermonters and other New Englanders have traditionally been considered industrious, pragmatic and thrifty.  Vermont is an agricultural state with no major cities.  Hardscrabble family farms, called hill farms, were the norm for much of the state's history.  The man in this portrait looks to me like a hard-working, no-nonsense farmer who doesn't take days off... Continue Reading →

“Princess Victoria” renamed “Princess Mary” for one day (Feb. 28, 1922)

Built in 1914 at Swindon Works in Wiltshire, England, the steam locomotive Princess Victoria (4048) remained in service until 1953.  On February 28, 1922, HRH Princess Mary was to marry Viscount Lascelles, future Earl of Harewood, and a locomotive was required for the royal train.  The logical choice would have been an existing engine in... Continue Reading →

Family in Brussels

This carte-de-visite was made by the studio of Albert Baron & César Mitkewicz in Brussels (Bruxelles), Belgium.  The mother's gaze engages the viewer while the father's seems unfocused.  The two sisters pose affectionately as the younger one reads from a book.  

Nanny and little girl

This CDV came from the town of Kettering in England.  My guess would be that it belonged originally to a family associated with a British diplomatic mission in the Middle East or North Africa.  India is also a possibility.

School dog and her charges (UK)

This charming little CDV came from Chesterfield, Derbyshire, but has no information on it to confirm its origin.  The girls are elegantly dressed and must have come from relatively well-to-do families.  After scanning the photo I noticed that one of the girls is of African or mixed-race heritage. I love the fact that the school's... Continue Reading →

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