Man with royal charter

This cabinet card photograph is the first image I've shared from Australia.  It was printed at the Anson Brothers studio in Hobart, Tasmania, which was in operation from 1878 to 1891.  Founded by brothers Joshua, Henry Joseph and Richard Edwin Anson, the studio became known for views of Tasmanian scenery, which received medals at the... Continue Reading →

Dolores and friends in Manila

When I started this blog four years ago, I decided to post only photos taken before 1940.  It was an arbitrary line to draw, but I wanted to draw one somewhere, and a century seemed like a good place to do it (1839-1939).  For one thing, sitters in photos taken after 1940 are more likely... Continue Reading →

MIT students at Camp Cunningham (1917)

This publicity photograph was taken at a summer camp in East Machias, Maine, called Camp Cunningham.  The camp was organized by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) to provide military-style training to students after their sophomore year.  The decision to organize the camp was made after the United States entered World War I in April... Continue Reading →

Hospital workers in Moscow (1925)

The back of this photograph is signed in ink.  Part of the name looks like Arivash, but I can't read the rest.  There's also an inscription in pencil which is legible.   The inscription: Москва 1925 год.  Горькое время студенческое в материальном отношении и счастливое в моральном положении.  Это не для всех, а только для... Continue Reading →

Seamstresses in Oppdal, Norway

Unlike the mill workers in the previous post, these two seamstresses appear to be posing outdoors, perhaps at a seasonal or mobile studio.  The photographer, Håkon Steinsheim (1860-1933), was based in the village of Oppdal, Norway.  (Historically, the name of the town was sometimes spelled Opdal.) The photo (cabinet card) came to me from Wisconsin.... Continue Reading →

Mill workers

This photograph has nothing written or printed on it to suggest where it might have been taken.  It came to me from Maine, so it may have originated there or in another northeastern state.  The setting appears to be a textile mill.  My guess for a time period would be 1895-1905. The surface of the... Continue Reading →

Young harpist in New Bedford

This cabinet card portrait was made at a studio in the port city of New Bedford, Massachusetts.  The studio belonged to a man named John O'Neil.  Google didn't turn up any information about Mr. O'Neil, so I looked at census records on Ancestry.  In the 1880 U.S. Census, I found a John E. O'Neil, age... Continue Reading →

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