Russian family at their dacha

This photo postcard likely dates to the final years of Imperial Russia (1910-1917).  It came to me from modern-day St. Petersburg.  The back has some standard lettering but no personal information:   I'm guessing that this family is at their dacha, or summer house in the country, because of the trees in the background.  Their... Continue Reading →

A brush for your thoughts

This small tintype portrays an unusual subject for early photography: a standing woman appears poised to brush the hair of a seated woman, who has a comb and other items in her lap.  The standing woman is looking down and is slightly out of focus, while the seated woman is looking in the general direction... Continue Reading →

A comforting presence

This cabinet card photograph came to me from Herefordshire, England, but could have originated elsewhere.  It has nothing written or printed on it. Update (March 21): Readers quickly informed me that the man in the photo was a postman.  His hat has the letters GPO on it, for General Post Office.  (Thank you to Val,... Continue Reading →

Women outside a factory

March is Women's History Month in the United States.  (International Women's Day isn't widely observed here, although that may be changing.)  For the past two years, I've tried to pick out a photograph in March which I thought was especially relevant to the theme of women's history.  In 2018 the focus was on education (Caliopians). ... Continue Reading →

Longshaw Post Office, Wigan, England

At the top of this cabinet card photograph is a painted sign: John Rigby, Boot & Clog Maker.  Under that is another sign: Longshaw Post Office. Wikipedia describes Longshaw as "a small residential and agricultural area within Billinge Higher End at the western boundary of the Metropolitan Borough of Wigan, in Greater Manchester, England."  Historically,... Continue Reading →

Young roller skater in Calcutta

If only we knew her story!  Alas, she isn't identified.  Her carte-de-visite was made by John Bowles Newman, whose studio was at 5, Old Court House Street, Calcutta (Kolkata).  The only information I found online about Mr. Newman was that he filed a petition of insolvency in 1879.  It always makes me sad to read... Continue Reading →

Three dapper fellows in Wellington, New Zealand

This portrait is the first one on the blog from New Zealand.  (There isn't one yet from Australia.)  The three chaps aren't identified, unfortunately.  The cabinet card was made at the studio of Wrigglesworth & Binns in Wellington.  James Dacie Wrigglesworth (1836-1906) and Frederick Charles Binns (1844-1915) also maintained studios in Christchurch and Dunedin.  ... Continue Reading →

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