Young men in Vermont in the final December of the Civil War (1864)

One hundred and fifty-four years ago this week, seven friends sat for a portrait at Nathaniel L. Merrill's Photographic Gallery in Springfield, Vermont. They look young enough to be in high school, or perhaps recent graduates.  The carte-de-visite photo has a revenue stamp on the back, affixed and cancelled by the photographer on December 22,... Continue Reading →

Couple in Windsor, Vermont, shortly before the end of the Civil War

The two cartes-de-visite above were made by Henry Cushing in Windsor, Vermont, in February 1865.  Windsor is on the Connecticut River, which forms the boundary between Vermont and New Hampshire.  The town is connected to Cornish, NH, by the Cornish-Windsor Covered Bridge, the longest wooden covered bridge in the United States.  Coincidentally, the portraits were... Continue Reading →

Vermonter who’d rather be doing something useful

Vermonters and other New Englanders have traditionally been considered industrious, pragmatic and thrifty.  Vermont is an agricultural state with no major cities.  Hardscrabble family farms, called hill farms, were the norm for much of the state's history.  The man in this portrait looks to me like a hard-working, no-nonsense farmer who doesn't take days off... Continue Reading →

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