Love in silhouette

This carte-de-visite came to me from England (Northamptonshire), but it has nothing written on it to identify the sitter or photographer.  The photo (print) was cut into an oval shape and glued onto a paper mount with an oval frame design already printed on it.  Such cartes were generally made after someone had died, as... Continue Reading →

Poised and confident in Porto, Portugal

I found this carte-de-visite for sale in Massachusetts, which is the state with the second-highest number of Portuguese Americans (after California).  Who was this elegant young woman, posing confidently at an instrument a century and a half ago?  And what kind of instrument was it, exactly?  It looks too narrow to be a piano, yet... Continue Reading →

Ann Birkin, chevener to Queen Victoria

The woman in this carte-de-visite portrait isn't identified anywhere on the photo.  When I bought it last year, I never expected to learn her identity.  Three weeks ago, while browsing the website of Britain's Royal Collection Trust, I noticed a woman who looked very familiar.  The first thing that drew my attention was her shawl,... Continue Reading →

Family in Buenos Aires, Argentina

This carte-de-visite may be the only photo from South America in my collection.  The family isn't named, but a stamp on the back identifies the studio.  It looks like Compania Fotografica, Rivadavia 420, Buenos Aires: Avenida Rivadavia is a major thoroughfare, and 420 is in the heart of the downtown area, surrounded by museums and... Continue Reading →

Henry Lenthall, early British photographer

The man above is Henry Lenthall (1819-1897), a photographer who operated a studio at 222 Regent Street, London, where the photo was printed.  The studio had been established in 1856 by pioneering daguerreotypist William Edward Kilburn (1818-1891), when Kilburn moved there from his original (smaller) studio at 234 Regent Street.  In 1862 Kilburn retired from... Continue Reading →

Young men in Vermont in the final December of the Civil War (1864)

One hundred and fifty-four years ago this week, seven friends sat for a portrait at Nathaniel L. Merrill's Photographic Gallery in Springfield, Vermont. They look young enough to be in high school, or perhaps recent graduates.  The carte-de-visite photo has a revenue stamp on the back, affixed and cancelled by the photographer on December 22,... Continue Reading →

The artist in the mirror (Adolphe Braun)

This carte-de-visite is part of a series called "Costumes de Suisse," published around 1869 by French photographer Adolphe Braun (1812-1877).  Braun's studio was in Alsace, France, in the village of Dornach, near the borders with Germany and Switzerland.  Each photo in the series presents a young woman in a traditional costume from a particular Swiss... Continue Reading →

Members of the Friends War Victims Relief Committee in Metz, France

Update, November 8, 2018: Thanks to the research efforts of my brilliant readers, I'm able to update this post with information about the group above.  The following quotes in italics are from a web page, Friends War Victims Relief Committee in the Franco-Prussian War, on the site quakersintheworld.org: The first official Friends War Victims Relief... Continue Reading →

Twins of Watertown, New York

They must be two sets of twins.  The back of this CDV doesn't tell us anything about them, but it does identify the photographer, C. W. Gill.   I didn't find anything about Gill online.  The Hubbard Block was built on Public Square by Volney Stow Hubbard in 1868, which is about when this photo was... Continue Reading →

The new dress

The day of the party has arrived.  She and her friends have been working on their dresses for weeks. "Let's take pictures!" "I don't know, I have a lot of things left to do.  Maybe later." "It'll only take a few minutes to set up the camera.  We might be too busy later." "You're right. ... Continue Reading →

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: