“Hop picking, Leeds area”

This carte-de-visite came to me from Massachusetts, but it didn't originate there.  The title of the post is taken from a handwritten note on the back. Update: Readers all agree that the location referred to was most likely the village of Leeds in Kent:   The British Hop Association has the following information on its website: The... Continue Reading →

Ann Birkin, chevener to Queen Victoria

The woman in this carte-de-visite portrait isn't identified anywhere on the photo.  When I bought it last year, I never expected to learn her identity.  Three weeks ago, while browsing the website of Britain's Royal Collection Trust, I noticed a woman who looked very familiar.  The first thing that drew my attention was her shawl,... Continue Reading →

Henry Lenthall, early British photographer

The man above is Henry Lenthall (1819-1897), a photographer who operated a studio at 222 Regent Street, London, where the photo was printed.  The studio had been established in 1856 by pioneering daguerreotypist William Edward Kilburn (1818-1891), when Kilburn moved there from his original (smaller) studio at 234 Regent Street.  In 1862 Kilburn retired from... Continue Reading →

Members of the Friends War Victims Relief Committee in Metz, France

Update, November 8, 2018: Thanks to the research efforts of my brilliant readers, I'm able to update this post with information about the group above.  The following quotes in italics are from a web page, Friends War Victims Relief Committee in the Franco-Prussian War, on the site quakersintheworld.org: The first official Friends War Victims Relief... Continue Reading →

Workers in South Shields, England

Here's another occupational carte-de-visite from England.  It looks like an early one, maybe early 1870s. At the mouth of the River Tyne on the North Sea, South Shields was a major shipbuilding center from the 1850s onward.  The photo was taken in an industrial setting, possibly a shipyard, by a photographer from the studio of... Continue Reading →

“Princess Victoria” renamed “Princess Mary” for one day (Feb. 28, 1922)

Built in 1914 at Swindon Works in Wiltshire, England, the steam locomotive Princess Victoria (4048) remained in service until 1953.  On February 28, 1922, HRH Princess Mary was to marry Viscount Lascelles, future Earl of Harewood.  A locomotive was required for the royal train.  The logical choice would have been an existing engine in the... Continue Reading →

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