Nanny and little girl

This CDV came from the town of Kettering in England.  My guess would be that it belonged originally to a family associated with a British diplomatic mission in the Middle East or North Africa.  India is also a possibility.

School dog and her charges (UK)

This charming little CDV came from Chesterfield, Derbyshire, but has no information on it to confirm its origin.  The girls are elegantly dressed and must have come from relatively well-to-do families.  After scanning the photo I noticed that one of the girls is of African or mixed-race heritage. I love the fact that the school's... Continue Reading →

Tamara and her little sister

I joked in an earlier post about sibling portraits being amusing, but a more appropriate adjective for this studio portrait might be "intense."  Looking at the back, the postcard was likely printed in the United States.  A note is written in a young hand in Russian: "To dear Grandma and Grandpa from Tamara."

Lessons in the grass

This postcard came from the estate of Hazel Alberts Peterson (1898-1989).  As a girl, Hazel Alberts attended Seattle Seminary, a Free Methodist college preparatory school.  College-level classes were introduced in 1910, and in 1915 the school's name was changed to Seattle Pacific College.  For more information about Hazel and her family, please see the page... Continue Reading →

“Maud’s Family”

This 1909 school portrait came from the same small Maine album that "Two Good Friends" did in the previous post.  Both titles are written in the album. Click on the images below to enlarge them.    

Open air school, Topeka

"The forty children of the open air school--where underweight children are brought up to normal--in their polar suits which are worn when the temperature is low.  The windows are never closed.  The observation of health rules becomes a pleasure under the direction of Mrs. Mary Hoover, supervisor, and Miss Emily Rogler and Miss Vivian Peabody,... Continue Reading →

Carnaval 1926

This postcard is inscribed "1926 Carnaval. LIX" lower right.  The reverse is a standard back with no additional information.  I'd love to know something about the people in this remarkable portrait!

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: