Couple in Windsor, Vermont, shortly before the end of the Civil War

The two cartes-de-visite above were made by Henry Cushing in Windsor, Vermont, in February 1865.  Windsor is on the Connecticut River, which forms the boundary between Vermont and New Hampshire.  The town is connected to Cornish, NH, by the Cornish-Windsor Covered Bridge, the longest wooden covered bridge in the United States.  Coincidentally, the portraits were... Continue Reading →

Newlyweds in Milwaukee, by William Wollensak

Milwaukee, Wisconsin, was a magnet for immigrants throughout the 19th century.  The largest group came from Germany, beginning in the 1840s.  The next-largest group came from Poland in the decades after the American Civil War.  Other large groups included British, Irish, Scandinavians, Serbians, and Russian Jews. The bride in the portrait above looks Southern or... Continue Reading →

Mazaicasuawin and his wife, Anpaohdinajin (1898)

This stereograph (stereoview) was made from real photographs in 1898 by commercial photographer Truman Ward Ingersoll (1862-1922) of St. Paul, Minnesota.  Ingersoll produced many images of Ojibwe (Chippewa) people and their ways of life in northern Minnesota.  I was unable to find additional information about the couple in this portrait. In the Library of Congress's... Continue Reading →

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