“Waldfreunde” Mandolin Orchestra (1922)

This photo came from a collector of banjos and musical ephemera in Boston, Massachusetts.  The names of the men in the photo are written on the back, along with the following inscription: Andenken an den Touristenverein Waldfreunde (Feuerbach) im Jahr 1922 This translates roughly to "Souvenir of the Waldfreunde touring group in the year 1922." ... Continue Reading →

S.S. Corwin in the Ice, June 1908

Within the image area of this postcard, the photographer inscribed the negative: "S.S. Corwin in the Ice June -08-".  He also signed it in the lower right corner: "By J.C. Wats".  Was his name Watson? Underneath the image, the sender wrote: "June 23/08  Well but Busy  C.H."   There's a lot of information online about... Continue Reading →

Faded festivity

This cabinet card came to me from Spokane, Washington, but it has nothing written or printed on it to indicate its origin.  The costumes might be Norwegian (or Norwegian-American).  The faded sepia print doesn't do them justice, but it's all that remains of their beauty and artistry.    

Ann Birkin, chevener to Queen Victoria

The woman in this carte-de-visite portrait isn't identified anywhere on the photo.  When I bought it last year, I never expected to learn her identity.  Three weeks ago, while browsing the website of Britain's Royal Collection Trust, I noticed a woman who looked very familiar.  The first thing that drew my attention was her shawl,... Continue Reading →

Family in Buenos Aires, Argentina

This carte-de-visite may be the only photo from South America in my collection.  The family isn't named, but a stamp on the back identifies the studio.  It looks like Compania Fotografica, Rivadavia 420, Buenos Aires: Avenida Rivadavia is a major thoroughfare, and 420 is in the heart of the downtown area, surrounded by museums and... Continue Reading →

Henry Lenthall, early British photographer

The man above is Henry Lenthall (1819-1897), a photographer who operated a studio at 222 Regent Street, London, where the photo was printed.  The studio had been established in 1856 by pioneering daguerreotypist William Edward Kilburn (1818-1891), when Kilburn moved there from his original (smaller) studio at 234 Regent Street.  In 1862 Kilburn retired from... Continue Reading →

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