Medical team in Pirmasens, Germany

This boudoir card photograph came to me from Maine.  The boudoir card format appeared in the mid-1880s as a slightly larger and more expensive alternative to cabinet cards.  The larger size was particularly suitable for group portraits.*  This one was taken in the town of Pirmasens, Germany, near the border with France.  The studio belonged... Continue Reading →

The choirmaster

This undated cabinet card portrait was taken in the ancient shipping town of Gravesend, Kent, England.  Gravesend is on the south bank of the Thames Estuary, about 21 miles (35 km) from central London.  The photograph was taken at the studio of Frederick Charles Gould, who became known for images he captured of the many... Continue Reading →

Hold on to your man

This cabinet card portrait was taken at the studio of F.B. Walcott in the town of Berlin, Wisconsin.  The back of the card has a logo with F.B. Walcott, successors to S.M. Taylor printed under it.  I've cropped and enlarged the logo, below, to make it legible.  The green background is unusual: (You can see... Continue Reading →

Romanian women in Sunday dress

This photograph was in a collection of materials dating to the years just before, during and after the First World War.  Printed on plain paper larger than a postcard, my guess would be that it was taken after the war.  On the back is a brief inscription in German: "Rumän. Bäuerinnen i. Sonntagsgewand" (Romanian countrywomen... Continue Reading →

Light in the darkness (WWI)

This postcard came to me from a dealer in Pennsylvania who specializes in photographs from Russia and Eastern Europe. He said the photo was Russian, which made sense. The only woman in the photo is wearing what appears to be a Russian nurse's outfit from the First World War. But who were the men, and... Continue Reading →

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