Family in Brussels

This carte-de-visite was made by the studio of Albert Baron & César Mitkewicz in Brussels (Bruxelles), Belgium.  The mother's gaze engages the viewer while the father's seems unfocused.  The two sisters pose affectionately as the younger one reads from a book.  

Nanny and little girl

This CDV came from the town of Kettering in England.  My guess would be that it belonged originally to a family associated with a British diplomatic mission in the Middle East or North Africa.  India is also a possibility.

School dog and her charges (UK)

This charming little CDV came from Chesterfield, Derbyshire, but has no information on it to confirm its origin.  The girls are elegantly dressed and must have come from relatively well-to-do families.  After scanning the photo I noticed that one of the girls is of African or mixed-race heritage. I love the fact that the school's... Continue Reading →

Young nun in Bourgogne

This ethereal CDV portrait was made by A. Brossut of Digoin, Bourgogne (Burgundy).  The young woman isn't identified.  I found a few references online to "A. Brossut, éditeur," but no other information about the photographer.  

Amanda Sanford, M.D. (1883)

An inscription in pencil on the back of this carte-de-visite says simply: "Dr. Sanford 1883."  She was easy to identify, and her individual story is fascinating and inspiring.  I also learned that Dr. Sanford's life and career were closely connected to those of other pioneering women in medicine and in other fields who supported and... Continue Reading →

Man with banjo

This CDV (carte-de-visite) came from an antiques shop in Massachusetts.  CDVs began to decline in popularity in the 1870s with the advent of larger cabinet cards, but the format remained in use until about 1900.  The albumen print process was used for both formats.  

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