Amanda Sanford, M.D. (1883)

An inscription in pencil on the back of this carte-de-visite says simply: "Dr. Sanford 1883."  She was easy to identify, and her individual story is fascinating and inspiring.  I also learned that Dr. Sanford's life and career were closely connected to those of other pioneering women in medicine and in other fields who supported and... Continue Reading →

Breaking and sorting rocks (1891)

This unusual image shows a group of men engaging in the labor-intensive process of breaking rocks into pieces and sorting them by size for use in road construction.  A small smokestack in the background indicates that a steam engine powered the conveyor which carried pieces of rock up to a sorting sieve.  

“In the Orkneys” (WWI)

These postcards were acquired by a British or American sailor during the First World War.  They were probably made available to the men as keepsakes of their service.  In the image above, a line of sailors is visible in the distance, probably on a brief leave to sightsee. The snowy hills on the island below... Continue Reading →

A proper meal, al fresco

This cabinet card came from Missouri but could have originated elsewhere.  The photographer isn't identified.  Since everyone looks about the same age--except for the couple at the far end of the table--my guess would be that this is a college group on a field trip or celebratory outing.

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