Studio portrait of a young cook

To continue the cooking theme of the previous post, this postcard from Germany is an unusual portrait of a young cook in her kitchen uniform.  Taken in a studio against a rustic painted backdrop, her spotless white clothes glow under careful studio lighting. Like CDVs in the nineteenth century, individual postcard portraits were often exchanged... Continue Reading →

Cooking class

This photo postcard likely originated in northern Europe.  The presence of a nun at the back of the room and a crucifix on the wall suggest the class may have been offered by a convent or other Catholic organization.  The back provides no information.

“Maud’s Family”

This 1909 school portrait came from the same small Maine album that "Two Good Friends" did in the previous post.  Both titles are written in the album. Click on the images below to enlarge them.    

“Two Good Friends”

This snapshot is in a small album I bought in Cornish, Maine.  The cover of the album has a dedication: "To Dad from Burt and Alice, Christmas 1909."  Each page in the album has a photo glued to it and a title written in a neat hand under the photo.

In costume in New Bedford

An oar appears for the second time on this blog in this cabinet card from New Bedford, Massachusetts.  Printing at the bottom indicates it was made at the O'Neil photography studio in the Hastings' Building.  The girls are all wearing the same Classical costume, with one holding the oar in her hand, suggesting it was... Continue Reading →

Man with banjo

This CDV (carte-de-visite) came from an antiques shop in Massachusetts.  CDVs began to decline in popularity in the 1870s with the advent of larger cabinet cards, but the format remained in use until about 1900.  The albumen print process was used for both formats.  

Open air school, Topeka

"The forty children of the open air school--where underweight children are brought up to normal--in their polar suits which are worn when the temperature is low.  The windows are never closed.  The observation of health rules becomes a pleasure under the direction of Mrs. Mary Hoover, supervisor, and Miss Emily Rogler and Miss Vivian Peabody,... Continue Reading →

A rowing party

I wish I could share some information about this group of young people wearing paper hats and holding oars.  They seem to be very close in age. Coincidentally, their hats look similar to the cloth one worn by Walter Kleckner in his 1898 portrait at the end of the post titled "'Kangarooing' at Camp Chickamauga." ... Continue Reading →

The Kansas Spirit

This snapshot came with no information, but the sheet music on the left side of the piano is "The Kansas Spirit" by George L. Wright.  Behind the title on the cover are the letters KU, for the University of Kansas.

Parlor trio

Informal early photos of musicians are surprisingly rare.  On the other hand, musical instruments have often appeared in formal portraits.  The postcard below was made some years after the photo above.

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